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Archaeology

Trace the story of Burgundy from the Palaeolithic period at Solutré to the Prehistoric cave paintings at Arcy-sur-Cure. The story of early civilization can be seen in all its glory with the Treasures of Vix, and at Bibracte. The battle grounds of Alésia saw the defeat of Vercingétorix. Guédelon is busy reconstructing life in the Middle Ages with a castle-fortress. There's much to discover.

Alésia

 

Bibracte

It was at the battle of Alésia that the mighty warrior Vercingétorix, leader of the Gauls, was defeated by Caesar.

 

One thinks of the Celts, or Gauls as rather rough cave-like people but a visit to Bibracte, the Museum of Celtic Civilisation soon dispels this idea.

     

Dijon Archaeology Museum

 

Escolives-Sainte-Camille

Housed in the splendid Abbaye St-Bénigne, the treasures from the site of the Source of the Seine are on view, plus other exhibits tracing the beginning of Burgundy.

 

France has such a rich archaeological heritage that it’s inevitable that important sites are still being discovered and excavated. There are more to be found, and many will be found by accident.

     

Grottes d'Arcy & St Moré

 

Grottes d'Aze

Some of the oldest and finest cave paintings can be found in the caves at Arcy-sur-Cure, a Prehistoric site not to be missed.

 

This system is the second important prehistoric cave site in Burgundy. Unlike the Grottes d’Arcy there are no paintings or strange hand-prints, but the remains of bears and big cats were discovered there.

     

Guédelon

 

Les Fontaines-Salées

Join the craftsmen building this Medieval castle-fortress using only traditional methods, and watch them plying their trades. This is no theme park, it’s for real and there’s another 20 years to go to completion!

 

Salt Springs, Burgundy, FranceSalt springs and mineral waters found at this site have had commercial, religious and therapeutic benefits.

     

Solutré

 

The Source of the Seine

The strange, precipitous rock called Solutré is such an important site that it gave its name to a whole Paleolithic period. Thousands and thousands of horse and reindeer bones have been discovered.

 

Significant finds were made here – a bronze of Celtic goddess Sequana and a fine collection of ex votos – effigies with a story to tell.

     

Treasure of Vix

   

To see a huge bronze vase made in 6C BC, standing 1.64 m high, in perfect condition is breath-taking. This is part of the Treasure of Vix.